© Keep Saraland Beautiful. All Rights Reserved. Website design and hosting by North Mobile Internet Services, Inc.

KeepSaralandBeautiful

13 August

Next Meeting

Meetings are held on the 2nd Thursday of each month at 12 noon at the Saraland Chamber Offices.

KSB GARDENING NEWS FROM JAMES MILES

Join Keep Saraland Beautiful

Business Membership Your business can join KSB for as little as $120 per year. Your dues are used for beautification of the city. When available, Business Members are entitled to the use of a custom-built garbage receptacle to be used at your business' location as long as you are a member. We need to build partnerships with the business community and you can help! Individual Membership Join Keep Saraland Beautiful as an Individual Member for as little as $12 or join as a family for $25. Your dues are used for beautification of the city. We need volunteers to join our organization for the betterment of Saraland!
Business Membership Form Business Membership Form Individual Membership Form Individual Membership Form
Mayor Dr. Howard Rubenstein, Council Chair Joe McDonald, Council Members: Newton Cromer, Wayne Biggs, Paul Stanley and Veronica Hudson
July 2020 We have now entered our regular summer pattern of daily afternoon showers. Though the rains are beneficial they come with a downside. They increase disease pressure exponentially. Keep an eye out for the early signs and have a plan in place. Your plan may be to prune, rogue, replant, and/or to treat. A good plan will involve more than one of those tactics to reduce losses. Turf Treat for Molecricket in the areas mapped in April. Spittle Bugs have been active for a couple of months now, continue to scout and treat when needed. Continue to monitor for Spittle Bugs especially on St. Augustine and treat if they are detected. Fertilize Centipede with 15-0-15 @ 6 lbs. per 1,000 ft2 or according to soil test results. Fruits Now is a good time to develop a bird damage plan to protect figs, persimmons, and other late summer and fall fruits. Bird netting is very effective, but you must plan for framing, adequate sizing, and time to install. Start planning for planting strawberries. You will order them at the end of the month or in August. You will plant them in October thru November. A couple of the more popular varieties are Chandler and Camorosa. Fertilize your fruit trees now according to your soil test report. If you did not have your soil tested some general recommendations are: tree fruits 10-10-10 ½ lb. per year of age; bush or vine fruits 10-10-10 1/3 lb. per year of age. Spread the fertilizer out at the dripline and not near the main trunk. Vegetables Plant pumpkins the first half of the month to have a Halloween harvest. Select varieties that state powdery mildew resistance for a better chance of success. Propagation There is still time to start softwood cutting from most ornamental and some fruit plants. It’s important to make sure your cutting tools are sanitized before cutting and between taking cuttings from different plants. June 2020 Last month we were extremely dry. That is a double-edged sword in the plant world. Dry foliage equals reduced disease pressure, but dry soil equals stressed poor performing plants. Now that we are starting to get some regular showers, watch for early signs of diseases. If you detect a disease you can prune the infected leaf or shoot off, treat with a fungicide, or both. The key will be to not let the disease get ahead of you. Turf Fertilize St. Augustine, Bermuda, Zoysia, and Bahia with 24-6-12 @ 4 lbs. per 1,000 ft2 or equivalent. Apply a post-emergent herbicide to areas where weeds are present. (A list of products and categories can be found in IPM-590 @ https://www.aces.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/IPM- 0590-Home-Lawns-Chemical-Control_022520L-G-copy.pdf) You can apply pre-emergent herbicide if there is a history of re-occurring annual weeds. (Read the label carefully as some products may have temperature and/or growth stage restrictions) Continue to watch for Spittle Bugs and Chinch Bugs and treat if needed. Fruits and Ornamentals This is a great time to take soft-wood cuttings. Take them in the morning and keep them hydrated. Some will root better with a rooting hormone which you can purchase at most garden centers. Some plants can be layered for a quicker easier process of propagation. Webworms and tent caterpillars have started to appear. The webs and nests are still small and easy to cut out. Treatments are difficult in large trees and not very effective because of the protective webbing. Early detection and removal is very effective. Fertilize these plants. Make sure to apply evenly around the dripline and not in piles. Vegetables & Herbs Continue to plant warm-season, heat-tolerant vegetables like squash, cucumbers, peppers, eggplants, and okra. Along with that, most of your herbs will last through the summer with a single planting. But with the recent rains, Basil may begin to decline and may need to be replanted. We've been seeing high numbers of caterpillars for the past few weeks. Scout your plants and treat them with the appropriate product. Products are more effective while the caterpillars are still small. For produce you are not growing, please visit and support our local farmers. You can locate them at Farmer’s Markets or direct to the farm. Here is a list of local Farmer’s Markets http://fma.alabama.gov/mapmarkets.aspx?County=MOBILE&OrgType=Market Enjoy the outdoors! May 2020 Controlling weeds will be a major chore from now until the first killing frost this fall. Mulching is one way to reduce the weed population. There are some herbicides that are selective and will not harm your desirable plants. Read the labels on these products carefully, there may be restrictions on what part of the landscape they can be applied and plants that are tolerant to them. Also, look for temperature restrictions, some products should not be applied when the air temperature is above 80°F. Newly planted plants will need a little extra TLC. We have entered a dry period for most of the county so irrigating regularly will reduce the stress on new plantings and increase their survival rate. When watering a standard measure is 1” of water per week. Another technique is making sure you are wetting the soil down to 4” - 6”. Insect activity is ahead of schedule so start scouting now for insects that we usually see in late May or June. An effective insect management plan starts with scouting, identification, and taking actions when the pest population stage is present at the appropriate stage of the lifecycle. You can continue to plant summer bedding plants, heat tolerant vegetables and container plants. Again, pay particular attention to watering them and have a long-range plan. Mulch around these new plants and freshen up existing mulch. Fertilize your turf areas according to your soil test results or with a low phosphorus fertilizer such as 15-0-15 at a rate of 6 lbs. per 1,000 ft2. Now is a great time to start planning for your fall garden. Think about what vegetables you like that grow well in the cooler fall and winter months. Do a little window shopping and talking to your local garden centers about plants that are showy in the fall and winter and think about color schemes for your landscape. James April 2020 We are a little ahead of schedule on fruiting plants. As soon as petals fall from the blooms begin treating for pest on highly pressured fruits like peaches. Fertilize woody plants including fruit trees according to your soil test results. Broadcast the fertilizer along the dripline of the plants. We have been dry for the past few weeks, you can begin regular/weekly irrigation of your lawns. Set timers to activate in the early morning hours and long enough to wet the soil down 4-6 inches. Aerify compacted soils. Fertilize St. Augustine, Bermuda, and Zoysia grasses according to soil test or with 24-6-12 at 4 lbs. per 1,000 sq. ft. or equivalent. Begin regular mowing of your lawns. Caution not to remove more than 1/3 of the turf height per mowing. Also resist mowing turf at tall heights. Tall dense canopies invite insects and diseases. Continue to plant turfgrass and keep it irrigated with frequent events and gradually reduce to once per week. Map areas where molecrickets are present and tunneling. You will treat these areas the end of June thru the summer. Apply a fire ant bait according to the label. Make sure the ground is dray and your need 2 hours without rain after application. Scout roses for insects and diseases and begin treatments at the first sign of either. Remove old flower heads to encourage continued performance. Continue to plant container grown plants into your landscape. Also, plant summer annuals. Now is the time to plant warm season vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, squash, cucumbers, melons, corn, okra, eggplant, sweet potatoes, and various herbs. There’s and app for that! We have a free app to serve as a planting guide for vegetables and herbs. Enjoy the spring, Enjoy the outdoors! James March 10, 2020 “Good Morning All, Continue pruning activities. If you got a late start on pruning that’s ok, you can still get it done. You can plant bulbs and watch for annual bedding plants at your local garden center. Plant container plants that you held over the winter and continue planting dormant woody plants. With the warming trend scout for insects on the new growth that is starting to emerge. Service your tools and equipment: sharpen blades, shovels, hoes, etc. and change the oil in mowers, tillers and other power tools. Don’t forget to sit down and enjoy the floral show of your landscape, it will be going on for the next few weeks. “He who plows, hopes; he who fertilizes, begs; but he who prunes, demands.” February 17, 2020 “With the warm wet winter, our plants are blooming and performing out of sync. With that said don’t rush into landscape/gardening activities too soon. Now is perfect time to prune our fruit trees (except blueberries and blackberries) and most of our ornamentals (not azaleas, hydrangeas, and gardenias) Apply pre-emergent herbicide to turf areas for control of warm season weeds. Mow winter weeds before making application of pre-emergent to ensure product gets to the proper zone. Avoid weed & feed type products. Also, do not fertilize now. You can still plant Irish potatoes, sweet peas, leafy greens, and radishes. Start your warm season vegetables (tomatoes, pepper, etc.) seeds inside. If you plan on planting tomatoes, watermelons, and squash, apply lime to those areas now. Continue planting woody plants that are dormant.”
© Keep Saraland Beautiful. All Rights Reserved. Website design and hosting by North Mobile Internet Services, Inc.

KeepSaralandBeautiful

13 August

Next Meeting

Meetings are held on the 2nd Thursday of each month at 12 noon at the Saraland Chamber Offices.

KSB GARDENING NEWS FROM JAMES MILES

Join Keep Saraland Beautiful

Business Membership Your business can join KSB for as little as $120 per year. Your dues are used for beautification of the city. When available, Business Members are entitled to the use of a custom-built garbage receptacle to be used at your business' location as long as you are a member. We need to build partnerships with the business community and you can help! Individual Membership Join Keep Saraland Beautiful as an Individual Member for as little as $12 or join as a family for $25. Your dues are used for beautification of the city. We need volunteers to join our organization for the betterment of Saraland!
Business Membership Form Business Membership Form Individual Membership Form Individual Membership Form
Mayor Dr. Howard Rubenstein, Council Chair Joe McDonald, Council Members: Newton Cromer, Wayne Biggs, Paul Stanley and Veronica Hudson
July 2020 We have now entered our regular summer pattern of daily afternoon showers. Though the rains are beneficial they come with a downside. They increase disease pressure exponentially. Keep an eye out for the early signs and have a plan in place. Your plan may be to prune, rogue, replant, and/or to treat. A good plan will involve more than one of those tactics to reduce losses. Turf Treat for Molecricket in the areas mapped in April. Spittle Bugs have been active for a couple of months now, continue to scout and treat when needed. Continue to monitor for Spittle Bugs especially on St. Augustine and treat if they are detected. Fertilize Centipede with 15-0-15 @ 6 lbs. per 1,000 ft2 or according to soil test results. Fruits Now is a good time to develop a bird damage plan to protect figs, persimmons, and other late summer and fall fruits. Bird netting is very effective, but you must plan for framing, adequate sizing, and time to install. Start planning for planting strawberries. You will order them at the end of the month or in August. You will plant them in October thru November. A couple of the more popular varieties are Chandler and Camorosa. Fertilize your fruit trees now according to your soil test report. If you did not have your soil tested some general recommendations are: tree fruits 10-10-10 ½ lb. per year of age; bush or vine fruits 10-10-10 1/3 lb. per year of age. Spread the fertilizer out at the dripline and not near the main trunk. Vegetables Plant pumpkins the first half of the month to have a Halloween harvest. Select varieties that state powdery mildew resistance for a better chance of success. Propagation There is still time to start softwood cutting from most ornamental and some fruit plants. It’s important to make sure your cutting tools are sanitized before cutting and between taking cuttings from different plants. June 2020 Last month we were extremely dry. That is a double- edged sword in the plant world. Dry foliage equals reduced disease pressure, but dry soil equals stressed poor performing plants. Now that we are starting to get some regular showers, watch for early signs of diseases. If you detect a disease you can prune the infected leaf or shoot off, treat with a fungicide, or both. The key will be to not let the disease get ahead of you. Turf Fertilize St. Augustine, Bermuda, Zoysia, and Bahia with 24-6-12 @ 4 lbs. per 1,000 ft2 or equivalent. Apply a post-emergent herbicide to areas where weeds are present. (A list of products and categories can be found in IPM-590 @ https://www.aces.edu/wp- content/uploads/2020/02/IPM-0590-Home-Lawns- Chemical-Control_022520L-G-copy.pdf) You can apply pre-emergent herbicide if there is a history of re-occurring annual weeds. (Read the label carefully as some products may have temperature and/or growth stage restrictions) Continue to watch for Spittle Bugs and Chinch Bugs and treat if needed. Fruits and Ornamentals This is a great time to take soft-wood cuttings. Take them in the morning and keep them hydrated. Some will root better with a rooting hormone which you can purchase at most garden centers. Some plants can be layered for a quicker easier process of propagation. Webworms and tent caterpillars have started to appear. The webs and nests are still small and easy to cut out. Treatments are difficult in large trees and not very effective because of the protective webbing. Early detection and removal is very effective. Fertilize these plants. Make sure to apply evenly around the dripline and not in piles. Vegetables & Herbs Continue to plant warm-season, heat-tolerant vegetables like squash, cucumbers, peppers, eggplants, and okra. Along with that, most of your herbs will last through the summer with a single planting. But with the recent rains, Basil may begin to decline and may need to be replanted. We've been seeing high numbers of caterpillars for the past few weeks. Scout your plants and treat them with the appropriate product. Products are more effective while the caterpillars are still small. For produce you are not growing, please visit and support our local farmers. You can locate them at Farmer’s Markets or direct to the farm. Here is a list of local Farmer’s Markets http://fma.alabama.gov/mapmarkets.aspx?County=M OBILE&OrgType=Market Enjoy the outdoors! May 2020 Controlling weeds will be a major chore from now until the first killing frost this fall. Mulching is one way to reduce the weed population. There are some herbicides that are selective and will not harm your desirable plants. Read the labels on these products carefully, there may be restrictions on what part of the landscape they can be applied and plants that are tolerant to them. Also, look for temperature restrictions, some products should not be applied when the air temperature is above 80°F. Newly planted plants will need a little extra TLC. We have entered a dry period for most of the county so irrigating regularly will reduce the stress on new plantings and increase their survival rate. When watering a standard measure is 1” of water per week. Another technique is making sure you are wetting the soil down to 4” - 6”. Insect activity is ahead of schedule so start scouting now for insects that we usually see in late May or June. An effective insect management plan starts with scouting, identification, and taking actions when the pest population stage is present at the appropriate stage of the lifecycle. You can continue to plant summer bedding plants, heat tolerant vegetables and container plants. Again, pay particular attention to watering them and have a long-range plan. Mulch around these new plants and freshen up existing mulch. Fertilize your turf areas according to your soil test results or with a low phosphorus fertilizer such as 15- 0-15 at a rate of 6 lbs. per 1,000 ft2. Now is a great time to start planning for your fall garden. Think about what vegetables you like that grow well in the cooler fall and winter months. Do a little window shopping and talking to your local garden centers about plants that are showy in the fall and winter and think about color schemes for your landscape. James April 2020 We are a little ahead of schedule on fruiting plants. As soon as petals fall from the blooms begin treating for pest on highly pressured fruits like peaches. Fertilize woody plants including fruit trees according to your soil test results. Broadcast the fertilizer along the dripline of the plants. We have been dry for the past few weeks, you can begin regular/weekly irrigation of your lawns. Set timers to activate in the early morning hours and long enough to wet the soil down 4-6 inches. Aerify compacted soils. Fertilize St. Augustine, Bermuda, and Zoysia grasses according to soil test or with 24-6-12 at 4 lbs. per 1,000 sq. ft. or equivalent. Begin regular mowing of your lawns. Caution not to remove more than 1/3 of the turf height per mowing. Also resist mowing turf at tall heights. Tall dense canopies invite insects and diseases. Continue to plant turfgrass and keep it irrigated with frequent events and gradually reduce to once per week. Map areas where molecrickets are present and tunneling. You will treat these areas the end of June thru the summer. Apply a fire ant bait according to the label. Make sure the ground is dray and your need 2 hours without rain after application. Scout roses for insects and diseases and begin treatments at the first sign of either. Remove old flower heads to encourage continued performance. Continue to plant container grown plants into your landscape. Also, plant summer annuals. Now is the time to plant warm season vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, squash, cucumbers, melons, corn, okra, eggplant, sweet potatoes, and various herbs. There’s and app for that! We have a free app to serve as a planting guide for vegetables and herbs. Enjoy the spring, Enjoy the outdoors! James March 10, 2020 “Good Morning All, Continue pruning activities. If you got a late start on pruning that’s ok, you can still get it done. You can plant bulbs and watch for annual bedding plants at your local garden center. Plant container plants that you held over the winter and continue planting dormant woody plants. With the warming trend scout for insects on the new growth that is starting to emerge. Service your tools and equipment: sharpen blades, shovels, hoes, etc. and change the oil in mowers, tillers and other power tools. Don’t forget to sit down and enjoy the floral show of your landscape, it will be going on for the next few weeks. “He who plows, hopes; he who fertilizes, begs; but he who prunes, demands.” February 17, 2020 “With the warm wet winter, our plants are blooming and performing out of sync. With that said don’t rush into landscape/gardening activities too soon. Now is perfect time to prune our fruit trees (except blueberries and blackberries) and most of our ornamentals (not azaleas, hydrangeas, and gardenias) Apply pre-emergent herbicide to turf areas for control of warm season weeds. Mow winter weeds before making application of pre-emergent to ensure product gets to the proper zone. Avoid weed & feed type products. Also, do not fertilize now. You can still plant Irish potatoes, sweet peas, leafy greens, and radishes. Start your warm season vegetables (tomatoes, pepper, etc.) seeds inside. If you plan on planting tomatoes, watermelons, and squash, apply lime to those areas now. Continue planting woody plants that are dormant.”